June 26, 2016 - June 27, 2016, Kings College London. Goal is to promote robust conversation about medical humanities research and the development of degree programs.

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WHO Public Health Panorama: Call for Papers on Culture and Health (Deadline, 29 September).

At the summer 2016 Summer Institute I mentioned to you all that the March 2017 issue of WHO Europe's Public Health Panorama journal would focus on Culture and Health. No doubt the topic will be very relevant to many medical humanities scholars. The journal is published bilingually, in Russian and English, and has excellent circulation among Ministries of Health across the 53 WHO European Region Member States. From the Cfp:

Culture and health
Experiences of health are strongly influenced by their cultural contexts. Culture influences health outcomes by affecting the choices that people make; the beliefs and attitudes of policy-makers, health care professionals and members of the public; and the ways in which health systems operate.

Exploring CCH requires a whole-of-government and whole-of-society approach, such as the one outlined in Health 2020. It means empowering people to find their own meanings of disease and health and creating more people-centred, culturally grounded health systems. A CCH approach also focuses on the role of culture in making communities resilient to health challenges, recognizing and engaging with culture as a potentially positive resource for well-being and exploring the extent to which case studies of cultural resilience can be translated elsewhere in the European Region. Last but not least, a CCH focus should also enable more holistic and nuanced health and well-being reporting that takes into account the subjective and diverse perspectives at the individual, community and national levels.

The deadline for submission is 29 September. For guidelines and how to submit, please go to: http://www.euro.who.int/en/publications/public-health-panorama/calls-for-papers/march-2017-issue-deadline-for-submission-30-09-2016

Also, feel free to email me at fietjen@who.int.

All best,
Nils

Nils FIetje | 25 Jul 2016

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Race in/and the Medical Humanities

The 2016 summer institute offered quite a bit of food for thought as pertains to my own thinking about race in/and the medical humanities. The graduate student panel, in particular, was extremely interesting and I can't help but to be interested in the ways medical humanities scholars are dealing explicitly with race/ethnicity in their work. I admit that my conception of race operates from a decidedly U.S.-based sense of racial formation and identity politics; but I'm interested in engaging with others from different cultural contexts about processes of racialization and ethnification in their own countries and cultural contexts and how that plays out in medical narratives and medical humanities generally. I'd like to start a conversation here, for those similarly interested. Is race in/and the medical humanities a peculiarly U.S. American concern, or do these concerns, however they may be articulated, play out in other nations and cultures; and if so, how? Who is doing work in this area?

Esther L. Jones, Clark University | 12 Jul 2016

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Defining Medical Humanities

At the end of our 2016 Medical Humanities Summer Institute, and in response to Daniel Hall-Flavin's eloquent definition in the concluding round table, we invite your thoughts on the question, "What are the Medical Humanities?"

Heyman Center | 27 Jun 2016

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So sorry for the delay in posting this to the site; I have been in transit and just received my credentials to log in. Here are the comments from the conference:
The Medical Humanities represent the work and presence of a community of scholars engaging in true interdisciplinary dialogue between those in classical humanities, ethicists, medical professionals, and translational researchers. The Medical Humanities and the study of ethics, however defined, offers us the best path forward in the quest for mercy and the ethical imperative to promote the advancement of medicine while resisting unbridled biological reductionism and the economic and social challenges that threaten to limit our role as caregivers. The role of the medical humanities and bioethics is political and practical, aesthetic and ethical. Its impact is intensely personal and pervasively public. Its strength draws on a foundation of keen observation and classic scholarship. Its study encourages hard won hubris season by personal humility and wisdom.

It is a lifelong challenge to master the art of generous listening and informed critical thinking to help guide us into a future of the healing arts as a truly integrative and collaborative endeavor that is sustainable in the service of living deliberately.

All the best. Dan Hall-Flavin

Daniel Hall-Flavin | 12 Jul 2016

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Suggestions for statement on tiered access policy

Hi everyone-

Please hit "reply" below to post any thoughts you have on a statement of access policies for the site. As mentioned during the site workshop, groups can set their own levels of visibility for project documents, conversations, and bibliographies: e.g. public, CHCI Medical Humanities site users, project members only, etc.

We will incorporate your thoughts into a statement on the site's "About" page that explains this tiered structure. Feel free to contact me at gw2290@columbia.edu with any questions.

Thanks-
Grant

Grant Wythoff, Columbia University | 27 Jun 2016

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My email address.

Hi Everyone. I realize that if you can see this message, you probably don't need it, but my email address is ew@rapidscience.org. Please reach out if you have any technical difficulties!

Emily Warner | 27 Jun 2016

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Thanks!

Emily Warner | 29 Jun 2016

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